Future News Worldwide 2019

hanna-paul

As Future News Worldwide conference kicks off in London today, let’s hear it from Hanna Paul, student at City University as part of the Erasmus Mundus Journalism Programme and one of the three delegates from India participating in the mega event, what she looks forward to at the conference this year.  

Some people tell me that they enjoy seeing the world through my words and eyes when in fact, I enjoy writing about other people and the world around us. This is one among the many reasons why I fell in love with journalism. It provides an opportunity to be at two spots at once. The invigilator and the spectator. The world of journalism has changed immensely today as, unlike the days of Doordarshan and All India Radio, anybody connected to the internet can communicate to a crowd or even virtually to a large audience thanks to social media. But how do you stand out from the clutter? 

The Future News Worldwide conference, organised by the British Council, Thomson Reuters, Facebook and Google News Initiative is the perfect platform for answering such questions as it brings together top quality journalism and the people behind the scenes of these social media platforms, together. Using social media effectively and finding the line between use and misuse of these platforms are issues both journalists and everyday users face. This is also what I look forward to the most at the conference this year, along with the excellent line up of speakers. The myriad of perspectives the conference offers, with over a hundred students participating from all over the world, is another highlight. The differences in culture, thought process, and ideas are definitely going to make it a unique experience!

Join the Facebook LIVE with journalist Sreenivasan Jain of NDTV who will be giving his take on ‘Speaking truth to power: how journalism can rebuild trust by investigating and exposing official falsehoods.’

future news fb live

 

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Future proof your business

In a Human Capital study conducted by Deloitte in 2016, 90% respondents rated soft skills as a “critical priority”. In this study, organisations indicated that communication and soft skills can enhance employee retention, improve leadership and build positive organisational culture. And yet again, LinkedIn’s annual learning report shows that 57% of senior leaders state that soft skills are more important that hard skills and they never go out of fashion.

Yet another L&D study, conducted in 2019, reveals that organisations with highly engaged employees are over twice as likely to prioritise soft skills training. Soft skills, including communication skills, are top priority for the majority of organisations in 2019.

After globalisation, which has resulted in the increasing importance of communication skills and intercultural fluency, the next big wave to have an impact on jobs is automation. As industry gets more and more automated, the jobs of the future will increasingly be those which rely on soft skills and the human touch. There is a growing emphasis on customer service, and impactful and professional communication skills will be in even greater demand in the new age of AI. More and more, jobs require greater creativity, collaboration and relationship building.

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Essentially, the only common denominator in L&D studies conducted over 1990s, 2000s and 2010s was soft skills. This is of no surprise to us at the British Council. We work with many organisations in India and around the world and have seen how our soft skills and communication skills training programmes make a difference to business performance. Productivity, collaboration, intercultural fluency, networking, creativity, customer satisfaction and communicative effectiveness are just some of the areas our training programmes cover. It also has a positive washback on the outcomes of other training programmes, which have English as the medium of instruction.

It is important for organisations and L&D professionals to consider these factors while designing their training programmes. Communication and soft skills training can future proof your employees and in turn help you set your organisation apart.

Author: Shivangi Gupta, Assistant Director, English India

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5 Tips to Become a Better Speaker at Work

Author – Neenaz Ichaporia (Academic Manager, Blended Learning)

How can you become a better, more confident speaker at work? Read the tips below for a range of useful ideas on how to do this. You’ll learn about websites, links and other resources that you can use. You’ll also learn how the British Council’s online language improvement course, myEnglish Workplace, makes you a better, more confident speaker.

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Assessment for learning in action in the classroom

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Author: Michelle Bambawale

Formative assessment or assessment for learning is a familiar term in education. Most teachers know the theory but struggle with the practice. I felt the same, till I took this Assessment for Learning Masters’ class, and experienced it firsthand.

For the first class, we had to read an article (Black, 2009) on formative assessment and were encouraged to posit our own theory. I did my homework, thought I had understood the concept and was ready for the teacher to explain it to us in class. Much to my surprise, she put us in groups and told us to discuss our ideas with each other, compare notes and see if we agreed or disagreed. I did not want to listen to what my peers thought! I just wanted to listen to what the teacher had to say. I wasn’t ready for either autonomy or peer learning.

Activating students as instructional resources for one another and activating students as owners of their own learning

I tried to ask the teacher questions directly, she guided me through the process of taking control of my own learning and peer learning, she asked questions like: ’What does your group think?’, ’Have you asked your peers?’ ’What do you think?’ I was required to redirect my attention to the group and construct my own learning based on the reading and the discussion. I felt very frustrated after this first class and hoped things would change, and we would be back to a lecture format. They did not.

For the next class, the reading was quite challenging, hence I really hoped the teacher would explain, it was on the power of feedback (Hattie & Timperley, 2007). She used a jigsaw reading in the classroom for us to discuss and understand the article. Left with no option and no teacher teaching, I decided to focus and slowly realised that I was learning from my peers.

Eliciting evidence of learners’ achievement

After about four classes, we were given an assignment to write a short paper on what we thought assessment for learning was and how we could use it. I had to push myself to reflect on the class and analyse the ideas and strategies used and how they had been effective. I was beginning to develop my own ideas, beliefs and theory on assessment for learning. I was learning from my peers and through self-reflection.

Providing feedback that moves learning forward

Over the course we worked on goal setting using the following steps:

  1. Setting personal goals: this was an individual activity as everyone was at a different place in their learning and also had different goals for themselves.
  2. Finding strategies to reach our goals: for me, these included reading related research papers, watching videos and discussing with my peers.
  3. Providing support: the teacher used several techniques like wait time, pair and share, and exit slips.
  4. Providing feedback which was timely, focused and precise and deepening learning by asking probing questions and suggesting readings.
  5. Reflecting on progress to develop self-assessment skills.

On reflection, I realised our teacher had used all the strategies for formative assessment in action in the classroom and I had learnt them through experience. I encourage you to do the same: reflect on your own teaching practice and try these strategies in your classroom. Empowering learners to take control of their own learning will enable them to do better and feel better about their own learning, just like I did!

Useful links:

Some ideas for self and peer assessment in the language classroom www.teachingenglish.org.uk/blogs/jvl-narasimha-rao/self-assessment-peer-assessment

Easy assessment for learning ideas you can use

www.teachingenglish.org.uk/article/assessment-learning-activities-0

More ideas on Assessment for Learning

www.teachingenglish.org.uk/article/assessment-learning

Read how to run a jigsaw reading in your English classroom www.teachingenglish.org.uk/article/jigsaw-reading

Watch Dylan Wiliam elaborate on the five strategies discussed here in this blog, from his book Embedded Formative Assessment

www.youtube.com/watch?v=B3HRvFsZHoo

Read Black and Wiliam’s original research paper ’Inside the Black Box: Raising Standards Through Classroom Assessment‘ to understand how assessment for learning can work in the classroom.

www.rdc.udel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/InsideBlackBox.pdf

Bibliography:

Wiliam, D. (2011). Embedded Formative Assessment. Solution Tree Press. Hattie, J., & Timperley, H. (2007, March). The power of feedback. Review of educational research, 77(1), 81-112.

Black, P. a. (2009). Developing the theory of formative assessment. Educational Assessment, Evaluation and Accountability (formerly: Journal of Personnel Evaluation in Education).

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Conferences for professional development

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Authors: Amy Lightfoot, Adi Rajan and Deepali Dharmaraj

Conferences are a great way to collaborate, learn from peers and meet colleagues from across the globe. It is also an opportunity to present your own research and learning thus sharing with others. IATEFL (the International Association of Teachers of English as a Foreign Language) conference, held annually, is one such example that brings teachers from across the globe together. It’s a key event in the professional development calendars of many teaching professionals and an opportunity to attend or present at the IATEFL conference can be a significant career milestone.

This year’s conference was held in Liverpool in the first week of April and had over 500 talks, workshops and sessions over a four-day period. Around 3000 delegates from over 100 countries met and shared ideas through these scheduled sessions as well as social events such as quizzes and pecha kucha presentations organised in the evenings. A popular exhibition takes place alongside the conference, giving delegates an opportunity to engage with ELT publications and institutions. The exhibition is also the venue for the IATEFL Careers Fair and a series of pop-up presentations on topics ranging from becoming a freelancer to presenting at IATEFL for the first time.

There has been a clear evolution in the IATEFL conference in the last decade, becoming more diverse and inclusive. This is evidenced by the election of the association’s first president from Africa – Dr Harry Kuchah Kuchah from Cameroon. As he recently posted on Twitter, ‘IATEFL is increasingly inclusive to teachers working in the global south [and this] is something to celebrate. I’m definitely interested in pushing this on because it’s been long overdue and very few thought it was a problem’.

This inclusivity has two key effects: first, it enables teachers from diverse contexts to benefit from the professional development on offer at the conference and through its Special Interest Groups. Second, it provides opportunities for teachers to network with peers from around the world, potentially establishing collaboration between their students as well.

We’d like to recommend some talks from the conference if you weren’t able to attend:

Teacher empowerment: leaving the twilight zone by Paula Rebolledo

This insightful plenary drew on research from general education literature to demonstrate a link between empowered teachers, effective teaching and learning outcomes. Rebolledo explored six dimensions that play a role in empowerment: impact, professional growth, autonomy, self-efficacy, status and decision making. Within this framework, she reiterated the importance of teachers making their own decisions about their professional development and encouraged institutions and associations to go beyond talking about empowerment, to practising it in meaningful ways.

British Council: Is English teaching inclusive? Do we practise what we preach?

Inclusion was one of the recurring themes at the conference this year and the British Council’s signature event explored an integrated approach to inclusive practices through policy, educational culture and classroom practice. The speakers at this event included Maha Khochen-Bagshaw, Varinder Unlu, Fiona Robertson and David Crabtree who presented best practices from different contexts and prompted an engaging participatory discussion with the audience on the possibilities and challenges of adopting inclusive practices.

Developing teachers and enabling reform and internationalisation in higher education

ocus on teacher development has always been an important part of the IATEFL conference and this year was no different. Of interest to professionals who work in teacher education was a talk by Zhanna Sevastianova from the British Council in Ukraine and Simon Borg who explored findings from a five-year teacher development programme at 32 Ukrainian universities. They identified practical ways of enhancing the teaching of English as a Medium Instruction (EMI) and English for Specific Purposes (ESP) at the tertiary level.

Future directions in ELT: where are we headed?

Finally, the concluding plenary featured an Indian speaker, Amol Padwad. This talk was by a panel of speakers from different contexts and areas of expertise and Dr Padwad was joined by Mercedes Viola who specialises in inclusive practices, Katherine Bilsborough who is a materials writer and Evan Frendo who is one of the joint coordinators of the IATEFL Business English Special Interest Group. These four speakers looked at the future of ELT from very different perspectives. Dr Padwad spoke about the English teacher of the future, suggesting he or she would still be a human being and probably a non-native speaker who is multi-skilled and navigates technology effectively.

Useful links

 

Plantation Primary photo (002)Photo: The South Asia IATEFL delegation visits Plantation Primary

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The criticality of critical thinking in the classroom

written by Girish Mulani and Soumen Das Choudhury, Freelance Training Consultants, British Council 

Why do we have brakes in a car? Take a moment and try to answer the question before you read further.

Here are some answers from a class of teenagers:
To stop the car.
To slow it down.
To prevent accidents.

Were these some of your answers? All of them are correct but one may surprise you: So that you can drive fast!

When explored further, this unusual answer responds to another question: What is the real purpose of a car: to drive it or to stop it? And that’s how critical thinking works.

Identified as a 21st century skill, critical thinking can be defined as the process of thinking carefully about a subject or idea, without allowing feelings or opinions to affect you. [1] In other words, it is the intellectually disciplined process of actively and skilfully conceptualizing, applying, analysing, synthesizing, and/or evaluating information gathered from, or generated by, observation, experience, reflection, reasoning, or communication, as a guide to belief and action. [2]

Often closely associated with problem solving, these skills promote self-directed thinking that produces new and innovative ideas and that solves problems. They are also about reflecting critically on learning experiences and processes, and about making effective decisions. [2]

The process of critical thinking

Critical thinking can be divided into seven stages:
1. Formulate the question clearly and precisely.
2. Identify the purpose, reasons, goals and objectives of what needs doing or answering.
3. Gather information, facts, data, evidence, experiences about the problem from various sources.
4. It’s also a good idea to get different points of view.
5. Distinguish between facts and assumptions / opinions.
6. Analyse and try to find similarities between similar incidents in the past.
7. Conclude and decide on the actions to be taken or opinion to be formed

Critical thinking in the classroom

Very often as teachers, we feel the pressure to know all the answers and to have all the solutions. However, in our experience of being teachers and teacher educators, this has been the most liberating aspect of our practice. When we focus on developing the curiosity of learners to explore and question, it’s not up to us to have all the answers – it’s up to them! We delivered a workshop at the recent ELTAI conference where we demonstrated just how this could be done. Using ‘fake news’ as our topic, we showed teachers how simple learner training can help young people today discern the reliability of all the information that is thrown at them on a daily basis.

These questions can help teachers be more purposeful in promoting critical thinking with their learners:

  • How am I directing learners in the classrooms to think beyond the obvious?
  • What should I do to hone their skills to think beyond the textbook?
  • How can I adapt the syllabus to promote critical thinking?
  • And am I, in fact, asking questions to make them think at all? If yes, what are those questions?

 Resources

  • Improve your own critical thinking skills by doing free Sudoku puzzles. You can pause, print, clear, modify difficulty level and ask, ‘How am I doing?’ in the middle of the puzzle.
  • Encourage your learners to create their own stories based on current events or topics using StoryboardThat.
  • The Critical Thinking Workbook, available as a free download, helps you and your students develop mindful communication and problem-solving skills with exciting games and activities. As a paid support, there is also a teacher’s workbook.
  • For teachers, watch this sample lesson on encouraging critical thinking with the help of the map of the world.
  • For a paid course, Business Result, published by Oxford University Press, comes with interesting case studies at the end of each unit. Except for beginners, there is  one for each level on the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR).
  • Preparing charts on a given topic, using song lyrics for subjective interpretation, giving project work, analysing simple situations and showcasing practical aspects of them, brainstorming ideas, reflecting at the end of a lesson on what was learnt and more importantly how it was learnt are some of the ways to promote critical thinking in the classroom.  
  • Watch this creative lesson, Learning to be a superhero, which develops critical thinking.  

 Additional references:

[1] dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/critical-thinking

[2] The Foundation for Critical Thinking at www.criticalthinking.org/pages/defining-critical-thinking/766. Last accessed on 21 November 2018.

[2] schoolsonline.britishcouncil.org/international-learning/core-skills Last accessed on 21 November 2018.

 

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Make meetings matter – Expert tips to improve your meetings  

Meetings that run on endlessly or where everyone is preoccupied with their gadgets can be a frustrating part of work for most of us. Don’t jump on the ‘boring meetings’ bandwagon. Here are 4 tips to hold effective meetings that energise your team and leave clear objectives.

1The endgame   

Ask yourself what you are trying to achieve through this meeting. Clearly define to the group what will happen because of this time spent together so they will better focus in the meeting.  Share clear action items, like ‘by the end of this meeting we will have created a marketing action plan with timelines and decided on leads for each activity.’

The medium   

A face-to-face meeting may not be the best medium to achieve your outcome. A shared, collaborative document such as Google Docs provides, or an online meeting platform such as Zoom or Skype for Business can help your team review a proposal in real time. Project updates could be shared effectively through a project management tool or communication platform such as Basecamp, Asana, Slack, or Microsoft SharePoint. Our ‘myEnglish Workplace’ courses delivered online with a teacher to facilitate is a great starting point to practice and build confidence using online collaboration tools for meetings and more.

The invite 

2Meetings are more productive if you engage your invitees even before the physical meeting happens. The meeting actually starts as soon as the invite is sent out. Set a clear, specific agenda so people know exactly what to expect. For instance, ‘identify three business opportunities’ sounds more specific and organised than ‘discuss business development’. Include all the details so that people know the venue and what to bring. Perhaps you could set a task for attendees like ‘think of one key opportunity to share with the group’ so that everyone comes prepared. Effective communication like this helps build long-lasting and effective work relationships. For more tips on relationship building, read this interesting article with language tasks.

The preparation 

3Use the pre-meeting time to carefully plan your approach. Have discussions with key players attending the meeting to uncover any important or sensitive topics. Understand the team dynamics if you want people to collaborate in the meeting and don’t want any surprises. Get a preview of the participants’ thoughts before the meeting. This helps you anticipate concerns, questions or challenges so you can prepare clear solutions.

What are your top tips to make meetings more interactive? We’d love to hear from you so feel free to leave your comments below.

If you know someone who spends a lot of their time in meetings, share this article with them. You could also enquire about our ‘Managing Meetings’ workshop for organisations which focuses on preparation, planning and timing in meetings, and skills needed for chairing a meeting.   

Each year, the British Council reaches over 20 million people face-to-face and more than 500 million people online, via broadcasts and publications. The British Council works with top companies across sectors to design customised business communication-related solutions targeting specific needs.  Our Business English Training programmes are highly relevant, practical and customised to the requirements of the company. Our interactive, communicative methodology helps us create a unique and engaging learning experience for every participant in our courses.   

To set up a consultation with one of our experts, contact us on 0120-4569000 or visit our website for more information.

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Planning your company’s L&D strategy?

English has emerged as the lingua franca for international business. The rise of the internet and multicultural organisations demands proficiency in using the ‘universal language of the internet and the world’ a.k.a English.

Here are the three main reasons why English language training should be your top L&D priority for the year.

Avoid communication breakdown: The popular request ‘Please revert/reply back as soon as possible’ may present a limited awareness of English and could be a direct translation from a local language, ‘Please reply as soon as possible’ is as effective and the use of ‘back’ is unnecessary.

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Non-standard English in international contexts causes confusion and poses barriers to building good business relationships. If not corrected, they can even lead to communication breakdown. To get quick and easy tips on Email writing and useful practice exercises visit here.

Save time, save costs: We spend 28% of our work week reading, writing or responding to emails according to The Muse and a massive 35% on meetings as published by Mashable India! The purpose of most communication in emails and meetings is to get things done. When employees improve their Business English, messages conveyed are clearer and further clarification is not needed. Colleagues then better understand what is expected and perform tasks more effectively. Many companies report that highly-paid senior managers often have to edit presentations and emails for non-standard English. If that’s the case in your organisation, it is time to consider English language training. With a range of resources and courses available, you can start right now with our free grammar practice app.

12 oct 3Boost confidence and propel leadership: You may hire people with excellent technical skills, but can they lead on projects that require a high level of communicative expertise? Effective language training empowers them to lead and perform beyond their job description. Don’t be surprised when a manager cracks that deal with a major client all on his own just because he/she recently attended a negotiation skills workshop!

Tweak your L&D plan todaysave costs and shape leaders by making language learning your top priority for 2018! You could start with our Podcasts for Professionals here with workplace contexts and embedded language practice.

Have you struggled with communication breakdown in the workplace and the high cost of training? What do you look for in language training programs? Comment below and let us know.

The British Council is the UK’s international organisation for cultural relations and educational opportunities. We create friendly knowledge and understanding between the people of the UK and other countries. We do this by making a positive contribution to the UK and the countries we work with – changing lives by creating opportunities, building connections and engendering trust. We work with over 100 countries across the world in the fields of arts and culture, English language, education and civil society. Each year we reach over 20 million people face-to-face and more than 500 million people online, via broadcasts and publications. The British Council works with top companies across sectors to design customised business communication-related solutions targeting specific needs.

Our Business English Training programmes are highly relevant, practical and customised to the requirements of the company. Our interactive, communicative methodology helps us create a unique and engaging learning experience for every participant in our courses.

To set up a consultation with one of our experts, contact us on 0120-4569000 or visit our website for more information.

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The 5 Cs of Email Writing

Business communication is heavily reliant on emails – an indispensable tool in the business world today. Emails need to be written as clearly as possible to avoid causing confusion with colleagues, partners or stakeholders.

Here are 5 ‘C’s to keep in mind for clear, concise, and competent emails.  

9 octComplete: State your purpose up front and provide the right amount of information. It is a good idea to explicitly state what action will follow and when and who will do it. For example, ‘I am writing to enquire about the new photocopier model manufactured by NEWX.’ We should state the reason for writing in the opening sentence of the email and present all information in a logical order. Here are some quick tips and tasks to start and end emails.

Clear: Use precise language. e.g. ‘You now have until 31st March to remove all machinery from the site’. Keep it simple so your message cannot be misinterpreted – don’t use big words. Use linking words and paragraphs to logically connect ideas. For more ideas on organising emails, visit Learn English Website.

Correct: Check your email for grammar and vocabulary. Grammatical accuracy plays a big part in how you come across to the reader and if the message was received as intended. Read it as if you were the recipient – is your message completely clear? Remember, words are powerful, but the right words are dynamite. Our ‘LearnEnglish Grammar’ app for smartphones is a convenient way to practise and improve grammatical accuracy. Get more information about this app here.

Concise: It is important to use short sentences with no more than one or two ideas in each sentence.  Take a look at this sentence: The recommendation I have, and this is the area which I will now address in this section, is that relating to the issue of whether we need to provide refreshment for the employees of our company. It being my considered opinion that in fact, it would save time if the aforementioned meal could be provided by our company rather than having the employees go outside for any eventual refreshment. 

This is certainly not concise and may confuse your reader. Keep your emails crisp with easy to understand messages. Sentence length and “big” words can distort the message, and if your mail runs to many paragraphs, you likely have a problem! Who has the time to read long-winded emails? A better sentence is: In order to save time, my recommendation is to provide refreshment to all staff in the office rather than having them go out.

We develop business communication skills online with a teacher to help our learners develop clarity and efficiency with our courses for organisations like yours.

9 oct 1Courteous: Consider what the tone of the message is and strike the right level of formality. Our relationship with the reader influences our choice of language (formal/informal). When talking to your reader, you need to tailor your writing to fit their specific needs. Even formal emails are expected to be less formal than formal letters, but it is important to know these differences. Our ‘Email writing’ workshop develops email writing skills with a focus on the participants’’ ability to adapt their writing according to the audience, organise information to enhance readability, use plain English and to edit and proofread their own emails.

If you like the article, share it with someone who will like it too! Visit Learn English Website for more tips and tricks on writing effective and efficient emails.

The British Council is the UK’s international organisation for cultural relations and educational opportunities. We create friendly knowledge and understanding between the people of the UK and other countries. We do this by making a positive contribution to the UK and the countries we work with – changing lives by creating opportunities, building connections and engendering trust. We work with over 100 countries across the world in the fields of arts and culture, English language, education and civil society. Each year we reach over 20 million people face-to-face and more than 500 million people online, via broadcasts and publications. The British Council works with top companies across sectors to design customised business communication-related solutions targeting specific needs.

Our Business English Training programmes are highly relevant, practical and customised to the requirements of the company. Our interactive, communicative methodology helps us create a unique and engaging learning experience for every participant in our courses. To set up a consultation with one of our experts, contact us on 0120-4569000 or visit our website for more information.

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MBA Students to Actors: How Everyone Is Benefiting From a Change in Tech and Education

[As appeared on The Better India, October 2017]

Using live online classrooms and guided online activities, these teachers are changing the traditional model and bringing the classroom to their students across India.

myEnglish teachers at the British Council, India are guiding adult learners to achieve success through interactive online English courses. Unlike most teachers however, their job comes with a twist – their classroom exists in the virtual world!

Read responses from some of our myEnglish teachers to questions about their work and their students.

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How did you get into this very 21st century way of working?

Purbani: “I was given an opportunity to be a part of an online teacher-training programme. The course opened new avenues for me and I realised that online teaching might just be the future of education”.

Avinash: “I’ve always been interested in the use of technology in making learning engaging and more accessible. I’d had some experience as a student and was interested in the implications it had for a teacher. I felt there were several possibilities to be explored with online teaching.”

Huma: “The excitement of doing something so new and the fear of the unknown meant it would expand my teaching skills as well as give the flexibility and convenience of working at my own pace in my own space – something I had been long wishing for.”

Ellora: “I love teaching online. It allows me to work from home which saves time and allows flexibility”.

Rajul: “I can see all my students; I connect with them online and deliver classes prepared for them in a relaxed, fun manner without feeling the need to travel and rush into class from home. I am teaching from home! Even the students don’t have to go to class; the class comes to them wherever they are”.

What’s a typical week on a course like for your students?

Huma: “Interactive, practical, exciting, and demanding nevertheless! Everything that happens in a face-to-face class is possible here. The only thing different – the location, of course”.

Purbani: “A student spends around five hours of study on online activities per week and meets the trainer and the classmates for two hours over a live online session. The study time can be spread across the week or can be spent on two consecutive days – the flexibility is key”.

Avinash: “Students complete their online activities in order to prepare for the forum discussions and online classes as they’re linked and build on each other. They respond to forum posts and add their own. This gives them a chance to practise the language they’ve learned and this gives me an opportunity to respond to their opinions and ideas and give individual feedback”.

Rajul: “They also review videos to recap their learning, increase their vocabulary and access the website to explore and learn more. Unknowingly they learn to manage their time and study independently, overcome their fear of writing and gain confidence in their speaking. They communicate with others without hesitation in real life situations”.

What are the benefits of teaching and learning in an online format? Have you faced and overcome any challenges?  

Huma: “I’m neither a technophobe nor am I tech-savvy. Like some of my students, I’ve had to work my way through handling technology but it’s been fun. I tell myself that I’ve been developing some 21st Century skills!”

Purbani: “In a face-to-face classroom, we often see that the learning stops once the learner leaves the classroom. On an online course, the possibilities of learning are limitless”.

Avinash: “One of the main challenges both learners and I have faced as a teacher is time management. In my experience, setting realistic weekly targets and working frequently and for shorter durations has helped most students and me have an enjoyable and enriching experience on the course”.

Can you share any success stories?

Rajul: There’s a student who was not even ready to write or talk to anyone because he didn’t feel confident. He’s currently enrolled in an MBA class! Another student was unwilling to speak in class. He would just say ‘I can’t’. After the course, he got selected to appear for a TV interview”.

Huma: “One of my students has special needs and passed the course! This also goes to show that we are truly inclusive and the courses are meant for everybody”.

Avinash: “I taught an award-winning actor. She wanted to develop her fluency and accuracy as she had upcoming projects in international films. Over 3 courses she has developed her accuracy to a great degree, especially in pronunciation, and is now so much more confident with intonation and emotion in the English language.”

Purbani: “At the formal launch of myEnglish courses in August a former student of mine spoke to the gathered press in an eloquent manner about his wonderful experience on our online courses”.

Ellora: “A student from my class wanted to speak better English so he could study International Law. When he joined my class he had scored a 5 in IELTS. He completed the whole level and took his IELTS again, he scored a 7.5. He’s going to Canada in 2018 for his studies”.

The clock is ticking. What's your

Pave your path to success by being a part of the British Council’s online courses. Click here to learn more about our online English resources to help you improve your fluency, accuracy and confidence.

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