Monthly Archives: February 2015

Live Webcast: Teacher Educator Conference 2015 (Main Hall)

Follow the sessions and tweet using #TEC15

Day 1: Friday 27 February

09.30 – 10.00 Inauguration by by His Excellency Shri E.S.L. Narasimhan, the Governor of Andhra Pradesh and Telangana; Sunaina Singh, Vice-Chancellor English and Foreign Languages University(EFL-U), Hyderabad; S Mohanraj, Dean, School of English Language Education, English and Foreign Languages University (EFL-U); Chris Brandwood, Director English – South Asia, British Council; Andrew McAllister British Deputy High Commissioner, Hyderabad; George Pickering, Trustee, International Association of Teachers of English as a Foreign Language (IATEFL)Chair: Michael Connolly, Assistant Director, English Partnerships, British Council India
10.00 – 11.15 Keynote address: The ingredients of quality in teacher education, RodBolitho
11.45 – 12.15 Rethinking teacher motivation for professional development,Amol Padwad
12.30 – 13.00 Streaming of students: how to promote social justice and inclusivity,Jayagowri Shivakumar
14.00 – 15.00 Evaluation in teacher education programmes: a critical appraisal,Geetha Durairajan (Cambridge University Press)
15.45 – 16.40 Moving from quantity to quality – implications for teacher educationPanel: Colin Bangay (DfiD), Maya Menon (The Teacher Foundation),Lina Mukhopadhyay (EFLU) and Amol Padwad (AINET)Chair: Rittika Chanda Parruck (British Council)
16.40 – 16.50 Continuing Professional Development Framework: going global
17.00 – 18.00 Blissfully developing teacher education materials, Huma Riaz andRosie Tanner
18.15 – 19.15 Moving away from traditional methodologies in language education – thebaby has been thrown out with the bath waterChair: Chris Brandwood 

Day 2: Saturday 28 February

09.00 – 10.00 Plenary:Learning to read in India: challenges and opportunities for enhancingquality in teacher education, Rukmini Banerji
10.15 – 11.15 Frameworks – they might look dull but actually they’re really useful for all sorts of things, John Shackleton and Tim Phillips
12.00 – 13.00 Are we supporting teachers to address student diversity in the classroom? Dilemmas and solutions, Renu Singh
14.00 – 15.00 Video cameras in English language teaching, Jamie Keddie
15.30 – 16.30 Evaluating the quality of teacher education programmes – whatworks?Panel: David Hayes (Brock University, Canada), Rama Mathew (DelhiUniversity), John Simpson (British Council), Renu Singh (Young LivesIndia),Chair: Sara Pierson (British Council)

Day 3: Sunday 1 March

09.00 – 10.00 Plenary: A fine balance: English language teacher education in21st-century India, Alison Barrett
10.15 – 11.15 Towards understanding teacher motivation for professional development, Krishna K Dixit 
12.00 – 13.00 Reviewing and improving quality in large-scale teacher education anddevelopment programmes, Sara Pierson and Duncan Wilson 
14.00 – 14.30 Curriculum change and innovation: insiders’ perspectives, RavinarayanChakrakodi
14.45 – 15.45 Plenary: Teacher education and quality assurance, Paul Gunashekar
15.45 – 16.15 Main Hall Valedictory

Download the Teacher Educator Conference 2014 paper publication – Innovation in English Language Teacher Education: http://t.co/BxFK6mKYum

 

 

 

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Book Launch: India’s Risks: Democratizing the Management of Threats to Environment, Health and Values

Synopsis of the Book : A prospective superpower, India is still grappling with a host of risks that threaten to hamper its progress. These range from environmental threats caused by GM crops and pollution; dangers to health from HIV/AIDS and maternal mortality; safety concerns about natural hazards, nuclear power, and industrial disasters; and challenges to livelihoods and values.

Some of the issues that this volume explores are: what counts as an ‘acceptable’ risk, and who decides? How should divergent perceptions of risks be reconciled? And, where is the line between science and politics? Advocating a more multidimensional approach to managing risks, the authors challenge many of the dominant perspectives in India.

The field of risk research, which has emerged over the last 40 years in the West, has been relatively unexplored in India. In an effort to bridge this gap, this volume brings together Indian and Western scholars and practitioners across the fields of psychology, anthropology, law, politics, sociology, public health, philosophy, science, and architecture, who offer insights on the theory of risk.

The book edited by Raphaelle Moor and M.V. Rajeev Gowda will feature experts such as Prof Shiv Visvanathan, Professor and Vice Dean Centre for the Study of Science, Society and Sustainability Jindal School of Government and Public Policy O.P Jindal University, Mr.Keshav Desiraju Secretary GOI Ministry of Consumer Affairs, Food and Public Distributionand and Dr.Nafees Meah, Director, Research Council UK (RCUK) along with Prof. Rajeev Gowda and Prof Ian Scoones, Director Steps Institute of Development Studies at the University of Sussex.

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GED: Women and Leadership ‘The Absent Revolution’

KEY ISSUES FOR DEVELOPMENT IN HIGHER EDUCATION AND SKILLS FOR SOUTH ASIA

This dialogue will:

  • Present the research findings from “Women in Higher Education Leadership in South Asia”, a British Council report in collaboration with the Centre for Higher Education and Equity Research (CHEER), University of Sussex.
  • Draw upon knowledge from the global academy and other sectors on how women have succeeded in overcoming barriers to leadership.
  • Discuss the importance of networks as a key to success – and why they fail.
  • Discuss enabling inclusivity and diversity within leadership as a key element of institutional culture change.
  • Identify specific actions and interventions for change.

The under-representation of women in influential and senior leadership positions in the global academy is a global challenge. A key question is whether women are being rejected as leaders or are refusing and resisting leadership positions in higher education.

Participation in Education for women is now approaching parity with men at both secondary and undergraduate level (and in some countries surpassing men). Yet this has not translated into senior appointments and leadership positions in education institutions globally.

In Higher Education for example, only 3 per cent of women are Vice-Chancellors in South Asia and in the UK only 17%. This inequity of access and opportunity is mirrored across the leadership spectrum from young researchers, senior administrators, professorships, Vice Chancellors and Chancellorships.

Whilst women are beginning to break the glass ceilings in all sectors of industry (even those in traditionally male preserves of manufacturing, IT and engineering), scaling the ivory towers is still seen as precarious and the preserve of men.

The social and economic benefits of a more inclusive and diverse leadership team have been well articulated. South Asia is experiencing a large sector expansion, which requires a new generation of academics and leaders, without perpetuating and reproducing the present inequalities, absences and exclusions.

You can download the report and programme schedule from this link

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