Monthly Archives: June 2016

British Council launches ELIPS 2 with Government of Maharashtra and Tata Trust

 

In March 2016 British Council signed a tri partite contract with the Government of Maharashtra and Tata Trust to launch an innovative teacher training project, English Language Initiative for Primary Schools – 2 (ELIPS 2) for primary school teachers in Maharashtra, India. ELIPS 2 represents a transition from more traditional model of teacher training to a more sustainable internally-supported approach which promotes holistic professional development through local communities of practice.

ELIPS2 will focus on primary teachers in government schools in Maharashtra and will take place over three years. In the first year, the project will cover nine districts in Maharashtra and in the second year the project will be scaled up to include the rest of the state. Following discussions with the government, it was agreed that the project would include initiatives for capacity building of the State Institute of English (SIE), establishment of Teacher Activity Groups (TAGs) at cluster level for the nine districts and exploring the potential of online training programmes and social networking applications including WhatsApp to support teacher training and mentoring.

Building the capacity of the SIE through the development of a core team of English experts is central to this intervention and its sustainability. In addition, a teacher training and development model focussing on building the capacity of the state to provide appropriate Continuing Professional Development (CPD) opportunities for teachers will be developed.  This will be achieved through a combination of face-to-face training, online learning through e-moderated and self-access courses, Teacher Activity Groups (TAGs) at the cluster level, the creation of online communities through popular social networking platforms and a teacher mentoring programme. All of these elements of the project aim to put the teacher at the centre of his/her own development.

Master Trainers, and later selected Teacher Facilitators, will be supported with British Council resources to facilitate TAGs. Existing Kendra Pramukhs (KPs) will be responsible for administrative aspects of these groups. The project will therefore build the state’s institutional capacity to support and implement large-scale, long-term in-service teacher training programmes which do not rely solely on cascade training as the medium of delivery.

Share via email

To be or not to be creative

The winning entry of the Shakespeare in India drawing competition in the 8-10 year old category

The winning entry of the drawing competition for children in the 8-10 year old category

Last week, curtains came down on the Summer School 2016 with Shakespeare at British Council Kolkata. Children dressed as Titania, Ophelia, Shylock, Bassanio, Puck and a host of other characters regaled their parents with lines from Shakespeare’s famous plays. For three weeks, classes hummed with ‘To thine own self be true’ and ‘Romeo Romeo, where art thou Romeo!’ as children experimented with the bard’s sonnets, comedies and tragedies. Children were so eager to show what they had learnt and prepared for, that one little Hamlet forgot to die! Students were both happy and sad. One child summed up her feelings with “Heavy lightness”, an oxymoron she learnt on the course. Another student commented, “Why can’t classes at school be like British Council classes?” Parents said how much the children loved the experience. One mother said that her child had hardly ever spoken English before but has now been the narrator for a Shakespeare play. Prizes were awarded for costumes and for competitions, including art and favourite words, both real and invented: scrumplicious – a mixture of delicious and scrumptious, melancholy – described as a tricky word describing both sadness and happiness, synopsis, gargantuan, solicitious, and  soliloquy – a word that a 12 year old student felt described him.

When asked to write about ‘My favourite actor’ one child wrote “My little brother is an awesome actor because whenever we have a fight and my parents rush in to stop us, he acts like he is the one who is hurt more!” Given below are the two winning entries:

A Day in the Life of Me
by Utsa Mohana Mukherjee, (13-15 years category)

I tap my foot restlessly on the polished airport floor, looking at the clock hanging above the boarding gate. Around me, lost souls rush about, trying to reach their gates on time while I wait, because I am too early. The nervousness, lurking in the pit of my stomach makes me feel nauseous as I think of the people I will have to face when I reach my destination. The place I ran away from years ago with a vow to be a better man. I have learnt lots of things, and the time has come for me to return. I am going home. Fear, that my parents won’t be forgiving, exists within me, but hope dwells too, and I hope that their love for me is enough. I hope this day in my life won’t end with disappointment but rather with the happiness of a long overdue, familiar reunion.

The Magic of Shakespeare
by Risha Sharma, (13-15 years category)

Sculptor of literary wonders
He who was a wise fool
Taught us lessons by depicting blunders
Kindled warmth in millions of hearts.
Ecstasy, violence, tragic plunders
Stories that over our hearts rule
Patient teachings that strike like thunder
Ever loyal heroes and their loving sweethearts
Admired by people everywhere
Respected by moral good
Enthralling millions, the magic of Shakespeare is beyond compare!

 

Share via email