Author Archives: Anita Clementina

#MeetTheTeacher – Ananya Banerjee

For your Monday of #MeetTheTeacher, we have today Ananya Banerjee, Teacher of English at our Kolkata English language centre. Ananya also contributes to our English in India Facebook page, and you will see a lot more of her this September.

ananya

Here are five questions with Ananya to get to know her better!

Shivangi Gupta (SG): Why did you become a Teacher of English?

Ananya Banerjee (AB): I’ve always been fascinated with the English language and the impact it can have in a spoken or written conversation. My love for books have been instrumental in making me fall in love with the English language which eventually lead me to do the CELTA and become a teacher.

SG: What is one thing that you like most about your job? And what do you like least?

AB: I love the mix of students that I get each batch. My students have ranged from retired professionals to children as young as seven years. I’ve had students from across the country and even from outside India from all walks of life. Each of them is strongly motivated and their enthusiasm is contagious!

SG: What are students at the British Council like?

AB: They’re highly motivated learners and are goal oriented. They believe in the power of the English language and as a teacher, I learn from them as well!

SG: If there was one study tip that you could give to your students, what would it be? 

AB: Don’t be afraid of making mistakes! Making mistakes is part of the entire learning process and will only help you to identify your strengths and weaknesses. Also, read, read and read! The more widely you read, you will pick up the nuances of the language better.

SG: Complete the sentence, “If I wasn’t a teacher, I’d be…” 

AB: “…a writer or a journalist.”

So tell us about your favourite teacher this Monday on our English in India Facebook page using the hashtag #MeetTheTeacher!

 

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Four English apps you need to download today!

Are you vying for a promotion? Or you want to do well in your exams? Whatever your reason may be, if you want to learn English, your mobile phone can be your personal tutor! All you need to do is to download these British Council apps.

Mobile appsLearnEnglish Audio & Video Long commute to work or university? Podcasts are the perfect way to beat your commute blues as you learn. This British Council app features podcasts and videos on interesting topics such as famous stories and poems, UK food and culture as well as everyday life situations. A moving audio-script and pitch control in this app help you with listening and understanding the podcasts. These podcasts come with comprehension questions, a tape-script and glossary.

Johnny Grammar’s Word Challenge Are you super competitive? Then this app is for you! Beat the clock and answer as many spelling, vocabulary and grammar questions as you can in this 60-second quiz! Earn Grammar Guru, Word Wizard and Supreme Speller badges by completing all levels. Beat your score to earn the ultimate Johnny’s Gold badge!

LearnEnglish Sports World Have the Olympics hangover? Now you don’t have to wait four years for your next dose of sports! In this app you can learn hundreds of sports related words with this highly addictive hidden object and word game! Explore a beautifully illustrated sports scene to find 290 hidden sports objects. In addition to finding the objects, you will have to recognise and correctly spell them to earn medals!

LearnEnglish Grammar (UK Edition) This is our number one educational mobile app and is the best way to improve your English grammar at home, on the move, or just about anywhere! This app is designed for all learners, whether you’re a beginner or an expert! In this app you can answer over 1000 practice questions across 10 unique activity types, including fill-in-the-blanks, reordering words and labelling, to achieve better grammar accuracy.

Feeling app-tastic? Go download these apps today!

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5 common words that have different origins

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How international is English? Over the centuries the English language has assimilated words and phrases from a variety of other languages.

Here are 5 common words that have different origins.

Veranda/Verandah: A sheltered gallery or terrace attached to a house or some other building. The word began to appear in the English language early in the 18th century. In Hindi, the word varanda has a similar meaning. This is not the source of the word, however, as it is thought to derive from the Portuguese word varanda meaning a balcony.

Kudos: An ancient Greek word that means “glory” or “reknown”. In ancient Greek culture, glory was found on the battlefield, much like every other civilization. When a solider was refused his earned due, or kudos, it was considered a very serious insult. One of the most famous examples of kudos is in the Iliad when Agamemnon takes the maiden Briseis from the soldier Achilles as a gift of honor- kudos earned from his glory in battle.

Glitch: A word for “slip up”, glitch is believed to be a conglomeration of two words, both that meant to slip or slide, around 1962: “glitshen” (Yiddish) and “glitschen” (German). It was first used in English by American astronauts when there was a spike in an electrical current, and then broadened to other technical mishaps. (Image: GLITCH – Designing Imperfection.)

Assassin: The origins of this Arabic word date back to the ninth century, when an Islamic sect was led to overthrow the Suni Muslims.  Yemeni Shiite Hasan-I Sabbah was the founder of the group and set about his mission by targeting the enemies’ leaders. The group was given the name Hashshashin, meaning hashish-eaters, and was converted into English in 1603 as “assassin”.

Déjà vu: “I’m having déjà vu” has somehow secretly slipped into English to solely describe an inexplicable instance that may have never actually happened.

“Already seen,” is the English translation of the French phrase with which we associate that weird feeling of reliving the same past experience. In France you’ll hear this word on a daily basis, because it’s used to express “having re-seen” a person, place or things, not in another life or dimension. In other words, it’s a factual encounter.

The French do believe in the weird phenomenon, but have a different way of spelling it (with a hyphen), déjà-vu. There is no difference in pronunciation though, which is why context is always key!

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7 free ways to meet your #VocabGoals

#VocabGoals

#VocabGoals

What is your vocabulary score on this fun test? I got 3560/4000 on my first try!

Learning new words is a great way to improve your English. We come across new words every day and can easily add them to our repertoire. In case you are wondering, here is the meaning of repertoire!

Here are 7 free ways you can meet your #VocabGoals and get a better vocabulary score than mine!

Read. A lot. There is just no substitute for reading as an excellent way of acquiring new words. Underline any new words you come across while reading, unless it’s a book from the library! Guess what they could mean by reading the text and thinking of the context in which they have been used. Now see the dictionary. How off were you? Not much? Very good! Now note down the meaning of the word in your personal word journal.

Listen to podcasts. Don’t have time to read? Podcasts are your new BFF! What’s great about them is you can subscribe to the ones you like and can listen when you please; driving your car, riding the metro or even cooking! Do remember to write the new words you learn in your word journal. Don’t worry about finding podcasts, there are tons to good ones.

Download a vocab app. Learn on the go using any of the thousands of vocabulary apps which you can download on your phone. Try out activities, play games, rank on leader-boards. Learning was never this fun!

Play word games. Can you complete the daily crossword in less than 20 minutes? What about Pictionary? Word games are a great way to make things fun and challenge yourself. Once you are confident playing on your own, try some multi-player games. For now here are some good ones you can start with.

Use social media. Join an English language learning Facebook page like the British Council’s English in India page or the LearnEnglish British Council page.  These pages post a number of words, vocabulary learning tips and games every day. You can also participate in contests, interact with other learners and ask questions. Learn, with a little help from your (social media) friends!

Set a vocab goal. Nothing like a goal to work towards and motivate yourself. Set yourself a target to learn a certain number of words every week. How many weeks in a row can you learn 21 new words, three for each day of the week? Post your words of the day on your Facebook page to keep count. This way you can also share what you are learning with your friends. And don’t forget to reward yourself once you achieve your #VocabGoals.

Use new words. Practice makes perfect. Use the new words from your word journal while you are writing or speaking. Think of if they had the desired effect on your reader or listener. Did they make your communication better? Use them again, this time with more accuracy and confidence! Now they are part of your repertoire. See what I did there?

So, what are your waiting for? Go get your #VocabGoals!

Post by – Shivangi Gupta, Head Business Development English (Customers) India, English

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