Category Archives: English for Progress Policy Dialogue

How many years of pre-service training?

Prof.  Siddiqui, Chair of the National Council for Teacher Education (NCTE)talked about the development of new curriculum framework for teacher education in India that he hopes will be implemented nation wide over the next 3 to 4 years.
He says pre-service, in-service and professsional development of teachers must be considered as a continuum of teacher education.
He says there has been a shift towards a more constructivist approach to learning. He recognises a need to enhance language competence and a need to give space for teachers to become reflective practitioners.
Professor Siddiqui recommends a 2 years post graduation teacher training programme, or 4- 5 years for school leavers (after plus 2).
How many years pre-service training do you think teachers need?

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How to manage educational change

Dr Martin Wedell, Senior Lecturer, University of Leeds presented a session around planning for change in education.

He said that we are better at planning for change than seeing change in practice.

He also said change is unlikely to be identically implemented and that ultimately it is what teachers do in classrooms that determines what changes have taken place.

The neglect of how people actually experience change as distinct from how it might have been intended is at the heart of the spectacular failure of most social  and educational change policies.

Transition is a complex process – changing teachers to facilitators – we often think that training will take care of that. But it is also a matter of systemic support  – both visible and invisible.

Societal expectations and assessment systems must also change as well as the teachers and their teaching to ensure successful change processes.

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Don’t miss Manish Sabharwal’s power of rhetoric

In this session, one of the highlights of the two-day policy dialogue, Manish Sabharwal casually steers us  down an enchanted river of  laid back eloquence ,  deftly pointing out some big ideas along the way. 

It’s a mesmirising  speech on ‘Skills for Employablity’.  Catch it here:

http://www.britishcouncil.org.in/efponline/sessions/19_3.html

Analogies like:  Cambrian explosions, ovarian lotteries;  thought worlds, policy orphans,; good is NOT the enemy of the great, bad is better than nothing.

What are your thoughts?

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What are employability skills?

Stephen Jenner, Deputy Head Corporate Training, British Council India, poses this question as one of the parallel speakers for the Session ‘Meeting the Recruitment Challenge’.

Stephen stresses the need for a global benchmarking tool and suggests the CEF, or rather ‘CF’ as it is more commonly being referred to.

Stephen summarises the BPO recruiter’s daily challenge:
1. I need people with good English, but what does that mean?
2. What exactly are the communication skills I need for this specific process?
3. What do I do with borderliners?
4. How do I transform new recruits into first class employees?

We would love to hear your ideas, suggestions and answers to these questions! Keep your comments coming in…

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CEF in the BPO industry

Stephen Jenner, Deputy Head Corporate Training, British Council raised a number of issues and challenges which BPO recruiters face on a daily basis.

Stephen showed how the British Council has used the CEF, a global language benchmark, as a tool to help overcome some of the challenges.

We’d be interested in hearing of any other companies who have used the CEF in areas of recruitment and language training.

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High speed eloquence

I want to draw your attention to Manish Sabharwal’s presentation at the Third Policy Dialogue, Session 3, Building Skills for Employability. Manish is CEO and President of Team Lease.

Manish spoke with such eloquence, wit and at such breakneck speed, that he managed to keep us all on the edge of our seats straight after lunch! His talk is peppered with so many wonderful soundbytes that I urge you to view at it in your own time. Find out what he meant by ‘the ovarian lottery’ and why  ’English is like (Microsoft) Windows.’

Enjoy!

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The President’s shoe

I hope Som Mittal will forgive me for sharing this story, told to me by a very senior corporate delegate. I thought it was such a nice conference story that I wanted to blog about it. So, it seems Som lost the sole of his shoe during the panel discussion this morning. He left the stage and bumped into the corporate delegate in the foyer, who promptly offered to swap shoes with him, saying ‘Well, NASSCOM has always done a lot for us’. While Som returned to the panel discussion (with his new shoes) the delegate very kindly sent out Som’s soleless shoe for repair. Som was later able to leave the conference with his sole intact.

What a lovely story!

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