Tag Archives: David Graddol

English Next India – what does it mean to you?

We’ve all had a bit of time to digest David Graddol’s ‘tiny tome’ (not my quote) during the Third Policy Dialogue. If not, you can still view the recording of his presentation at http://www.britishcouncil.org.in/efponline/sessions/18.html

What I’d like to know is what does it mean to you. His statistics and conclusions may be new for an international audience, but is there anything new for an Indian audience?

What are your views?

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The Future of EL education: Methodological Choices

Panel: Mr. HH Ariyadasa, Mr. David Graddol, Prof. Ajit K. Mohanty

In this main stage discussion some interesting points were raised. Let us know your thoughts and views on these issues. 

1. Advocating a shift away from rote memorisation.

2. English has to be embedded into multi-lingual school education.

3. In their current state, English medium schools are not the solution, and may actually cause failure in the educational system.

4.  (A student asks) Isn’t learning four langauges a waste of time? Why don’t we learn science instead?

5.  Moving English down to class 1 exposes the educational system at its weakest, most vulnerable point.

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How long do we have?

Three things I heard yesterday.

1.  Colombia’s National Bilingual Programme is a 16 – year programme and started 11 years after a new language policy was enacted.

2.  China is engaged in a 40-year language programme.

3. The UK Education acts of 1911 and 1918 which liberalised curriculum did not translate into progressive practice in the classroom until the 1960s.

What about India?

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High speed eloquence

I want to draw your attention to Manish Sabharwal’s presentation at the Third Policy Dialogue, Session 3, Building Skills for Employability. Manish is CEO and President of Team Lease.

Manish spoke with such eloquence, wit and at such breakneck speed, that he managed to keep us all on the edge of our seats straight after lunch! His talk is peppered with so many wonderful soundbytes that I urge you to view at it in your own time. Find out what he meant by ‘the ovarian lottery’ and why  ’English is like (Microsoft) Windows.’

Enjoy!

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Who supports the teachers?

Among the many fascinating statistic’s in David Graddol’s address last night,one comment resonated with me, and with many others if my conversations at the reception that followed were typical.  Any programme is only as good as the teachers on the ground.   Teachers sometimes attend training at the start of a new initiative but are then left alone to get on with it.

In Sri Lanka, there is a network of 30 Regional English Support Centres (RESCs) with well trained and committed staff who act as mentors to teachers at the local level.  The more I interact with the RESC staff the more impressed Iam. 

Is there such a netwrork in other places that provides continuing in-service support to teachers and is it well supporgted from the centre?

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Keep tuned in!

Dear readers,

First, thanks to all of you for your comments on our blog posts so far. It’s been a fantastic discussion! The conference will officially start this evening, with the introduction to David Graddol’s English Next India. You’ll be able to watch a recording of the event the next morning. Over the next two days every plenary session will be streamed live (and recorded). To access the session pages go to the Third Policy Dialogue programme page at www.britishcouncil.org/india-projects-english-tpdschedule.htm. You can then click through to each session page where you’ll see:

the real time of the session
the abstract and speaker’s bio and their PowerPoint presentation
a link to the film page

On the film page you can choose to watch the live stream (either low or high speed, depending on your internet connection) or the recording. We are aiming to have all recordings uploaded during the actual conference. Also on the film page we’ve put a comments box – just enter your name and email address (so that we can verify you are a real person!) and write what you think of the session. All the comments will be archived.

Finally, keep reading this blog. We have a team of dedicated bloggers – myself, Philip, Seamus, Clare, Nick and Cath – who will be posting their impressions of the sessions. We’ll also be live blogging the content of sessions on our Twitter account at http://twitter.com/efponline, so you don’t have to miss a thing! If you have a specific question for any of the speakers, post it to the blog and we’ll try to get it answered.

I hope you enjoy the conference and that the online coverage will help you to become a real participant.

Best wishes,

Stephen

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English in the corporate sector

The 2008 NASSCOM Everest report warned that the ITES sector in India needs to recruit beyond the ‘ready to eat’ pool of talented graduates. With BPO expanding into 2nd and 3rd tier cities and even into rural areas, what does this mean for the future of the Indian corporate sector? How can India take advantage of its demographic dividend (nearly half the population is under 25)? What measures are necessary in the education and corporate sectors, and who is responsible. These are some of the questions we will be debating at the Third Policy Dialogue in Delhi, 19-20 Nov. What are your views?

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Hi everyone!

 

I’m Seamus and I’m a Senior Training Consultant for Project English based in Sri Lanka.  I’ll be blogging my way through the third policy dialogue giving you my impressions and talking to other delegates and giving you theirs too.

I’m looking forward to hearing about David Graddol’s research for English Next India and the debate around his findings.  I’m particularly interested in how this might relate to Sri Lanka and will be talking to the Sri Lanka delegation to get their reactions.

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Welcome to English for Progress online

Hello everyone, my name is Stephen and I am managing English for Progress online. This is our, virtual, version of the Third Policy Dialogue. We’ve tried to make this ‘invitation only’ event interactive and open to a much wider audience with using blogs, twitter and live session web streams and recordings. We’d love to have your feedback on EfPonline, and your opinions on the key questions we will be debating in Delhi 18-20 Nov:

What are the challenges and opportunities of English in the education sector?

Will English continue to be the ‘language of business’?

Is English a driver for development or an obstacle?

Are you a teacher, a policy maker, a learner? What are your views?

Don’t miss David Graddol’s major new research ‘English India Next’ which we are introducing at the Third Policy Dialogue. A recording of his keynote address will be available on 19 Nov. See www.britishcouncil.org.in/efponline for details.

 

 

 

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