Tag Archives: World Voice Project

World Voice Project: Master Trainer workshop in Delhi

The Master Trainer workshop held in August 2015 was a wonderful opportunity to re-connect with World Voice colleagues from our Himalayan partner states and welcoming back our dear WVP Artistic Director, Richard Frostick.

world voice delhi

Shubhangi Tewari, WVP trainer, conducting a session with participants

 

 

Having Richard amongst us, infuses us with loads of inspiration, new techniques as well as, ideas for the forthcoming WVP year. I re-call attending my first WVP workshop in March 2013. Watching Richard interact with school children and help them to find their singing voices was truly heart-warming. The positivity, love and ease with which he communicated with the students, has stayed with me and continues to inspire my own practice as a WVP trainer.

During the recent Master Trainer Workshop, I had an opportunity to share experiences from the World Voice Manchester residency program, which I had attended. Here I met WVP leaders and master trainers from across the world! We marvelled at the authenticity with which British Primary School children sang in languages from countries as diverse as Argentina, Chile, Brazil, the UK, Senegal, Ethiopia, Jordan, Palestine, Nepal and India at the residency finale concert in Manchester University.

world voice project Delhi

WVP workshop participants in New Delhi

It is the third year for WVP in India, and the state master trainers’ shared their incredible work with school children in Himachal, Sikkim, Meghalaya, Jammu, Delhi and the NCR. It was indeed wonderful to receive feedback from teachers that ever since they started singing in the classroom on a regular basis; the students were happier, smiled a lot more, were more energetic, alert, getting better at remembering facts or concepts and attended school more regularly!

On a personal note, singing is the most significant part of my life. I experience the happiness it provides on a daily basis. To be able to extend this joy to young people is the most valuable aspect of working with the World Voice Project.

Post by: Shubhangi Tewari, WVP Trainer 

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World Voice Project: Singing and drama in NDMC Navyug classroom

 

The third workshop for the New Delhi Municipal Corporation and Navyug teachers was held from 26 August – 28 August, 2015 at the NDMC Convention Centre, New Delhi. The workshop introduced the World Voice Project (W.V.P.) and the Drama in Classroom Project (D.C.P.) to a new batch of 30 teachers. In addition to being a top-up training for eight teachers who had attended previous WVP workshops (held on 1 October – 4 October, 2013 and 10 February – 12 February, 2015).

NDMC workshop

The NDMC workshop in progress

The workshop presented ‘music’ and ‘drama’ as additional tools to promote wider curriculum learning. The participants learnt new warm-ups, songs, drama/song teaching techniques, lesson-planning and ways of integrating WVP/ DCP with the curriculum. The discussions and interactive sessions were particularly interesting as participants (including, primary school subject teachers, music teachers, art teachers and special education teachers) raised thought-provoking questions that highlighted the relevance and effectiveness of an art integrated teaching pedagogy. While the session with 30 students from class five demonstrated ways of introducing WVP and DCP in classrooms and was appreciated very much.

School children at the NDMC workshop in New Delhi

School children at the NDMC workshop in New Delhi

It was heartening to hear the students sing Daw Hyfryd Fis (a WVP Welsh song) which was learnt in less than 10 minutes and curriculum linkages were established through it. The workshop concluded with the participants showing an eagerness to apply the newly acquired skills in their classrooms.

 

 

Voices from the Workshop:

Megh Malti: As an art teacher, WVP and DCP could be used to establish a friendly rapport with students and encourage them to think freely as well as, ‘creatively’..…. She felt she had learnt a lot during the  workshop and could use it to make her  subject (drawing) even more interesting!

Pooja: As a physical education teacher, WVP singing games could be used to engage more effectively with students. In sports or any other physical sport, quick reaction time….played a crucial role in determining the quality of the player and WVP warm-ups as well as, singing games could be used to facilitate this…. Besides, during her arrangement / substitution classes, she could use DCP to teach EVS and other subjects too! …..

Astha: ”Classes 6 – 10 were taught Senwa (song from Congo) in 2013 and they remembered it even in 2015! (earlier trained participant).”

Deepti Tyagi: ”She felt fusing arts with academics helped establish a good rapport with students. The entire class became joyful and meaningful.…….(earlier trained participant).”

Rajesh Singh Negi: ”‘Zaruri nahi hai ki aap apne bacchon ko tansen banaaein….bachoon ko kaansen banaein’…. and WVP helped in the endeavour ! [Translation : It is not necessary for us to make the students into Tansen (*a prominent Hindustani musician and singer), instead make them specialists in listening and relating better……. which could be achieved through WVP] (earlier trained participant).”

 

Post by: Shivaa Rawat                                                                                                                        

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World Voice Project: Manchester residency programme for trainers

WVP trainer Shubhangi Tewari looks back at her residency programme in Manchester

The week-long Manchester Residency programme, brought together master trainers from nine countries with World Voice UK trainers and vocal leaders from the Greater Manchester Music Education Hub (GMMEH). Each of the overseas master trainers’ worked in a ‘celebration school’ chosen from nine boroughs of Greater Manchester — Bolton, Bury, Rochdale, Tameside, Wigan, Stockport, Oldham, Trafford and Salford.

World Voice Project residency

World Voice Project residency programme in Manchester

I worked in the borough of Stockport with students from Cale Green Primary school, whom I taught a song in the pahadi language spoken in Himachal Pradesh, India. The students also learnt about some Indian musical instruments and some features of north Indian classical music. There were also one-off workshops in other schools in Stockport — Mersey Vale, Prospect Vale and Back Lane Primary schools.

WVP trainer, Shubhangi Tewari

WVP trainer, Shubhangi Tewari

The World Voice Project aims to promote learning through song. By learning a song from a different culture and using it as a springboard into the learning of various aspects of that culture and country made learning much more joyful. One could tell by the twinkle in the students’ eyes and the complete focus with which they learnt the song, asked questions and also by their impeccable behaviour.

I also had the opportunity to observe some activities carried out by the Stockport Music Service — like observing a Guitar Wider opportunities session in progress and also attending a squad performance by children at St. Joseph’s Primary School. It was a privilege to be invited to performances by the GMMEH brass band and “It’s a Musical World” event at the Macron stadium in Bolton, where many schools from the borough of Bolton participated in and presented music from cultures as diverse such as the Carribean, Colombian, native American and South African, among others.

On the final day of the residency, we had performances through the day at the University of Manchester, with students from every celebration school from the Greater Manchester region, performing the songs they learnt from India, Jordan, Palestine, Senegal, Nepal, Ethiopia, Chile, Brazil and Argentina. They even sung local songs and a number specially written for the World Voice Project called Starlight.

World Voice workshop in Manchester

World Voice workshop in Manchester

It was incredible to watch so many young children from the UK sing in different languages — Pahadi, Amharic, Wolof, Arabic, Spanish and Nepali, which they had picked up within a matter of four sessions. The experience was and deeply moving, re-iterating for all to see, the immense power of music and song in cutting across barriers of language, culture and all other markers of difference and creating sheer joy, a positive inquisitiveness into lives’ and cultures’ different from one’s own and a sense of remarkable achievement.

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