Technology for teachers: from awareness to integration

By Adi Rajan, Project Coordinator, British Council, India

How do you feel about using technology for teaching and your professional development? Do you love it? Do you hate it? Does it depend what day, which learners, what technology it is?

For those of us who are digital immigrants, integrating information and communication technology (ICT) into our teaching practice and using technology for our own professional development can seem either an impossible challenge or perhaps a distraction from ‘real teaching’. This is especially true when we are confronted with the skills our students, who are often digital natives, demonstrate with new technology, along with what might seem to be an unhealthy obsession with screens. On the other hand, using technology offers exciting opportunities to improve our teaching and new routes to professional development.

The digital landscape we find ourselves in is vast. Where do we start and what path should we follow to make the process of developing ourselves with technology manageable and meaningful within our teaching contexts? The professional practice of ‘Integrating ICT’ on the British Council’s Continuing Professional Development (CPD) Framework for teachers gives us a handy map for exploring this digital world across four different stages of development.

1.       Awareness

Setting off on a digital journey requires us to develop an awareness of what’s out there. The Internet is full of resources for professional development and classroom teaching. From blogs to e-books and webinars to online courses, you should be able to find something that meets your specific needs.

2.       Understanding

Before launching into active participation, it’s a good idea to observe interactions and gradually develop an understanding of how communication takes place in these forums. Another way of building your digital confidence is through participation in online conferences. These are hosted regularly by the British Council and teaching associations including IATEFL, OLLReN and the Virtual Round Table.

You can also sign up for a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) – for example on the FutureLearn platform – and join thousands who are learning online in a flexible but collaborative way. If you’re looking for a more personal experience, enroll in an e-moderated course. These are like MOOCs but tend to be on a smaller scale with more opportunities for completing assignments and getting feedback from a tutor. Examples include the British Council’s tutored courses on special educational needs and Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL).

3.       Engagement

Now it’s time to start producing your own digital content. For instance, if you’ve been reading and becoming inspired by blogs written by other teachers, why not start your own teaching blog? My own experience with writing an ELT blog  has been extremely enriching. Blogging has made me a more reflective teacher and given me opportunities to build deep connections with teachers from around the world.

You can also use online tools to design a presentation or document on a topic that interests you or explores some insights from the classroom. To make this a richer experience, you could work with peers using an online collaborative tool. The next step is sharing this work with colleagues on social media which will enable you to contribute productively to online communities of practice.

4.       Integration

Finally, you are ready to showcase your digital experiences and help other teachers complete their development journey. Identify opportunities for giving a webinar presentation or try to organise your own. This will help you consolidate a range of technology-enabled skills and provide valuable insights to others. You can also become more actively involved by coordinating and organising events such as hosting a Twitter chat or a webinar.

The digital world that perhaps seemed so unfamiliar at first is that one that you will hopefully come to see as a source of comfort and strength, as you draw on the global connections you build to overcome challenges and achieve your professional development goals. In time, you may even begin to recognise that this technology-driven world that you initially felt you didn’t belong to, was in fact yours all along!

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Try our new Technology for Teachers series which includes easy-to-use two-page guides some tools that explored in this blog. We’ll be sharing new guides every week over the next couple of months.


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3 thoughts on “Technology for teachers: from awareness to integration

  1. Sonali Bhattacharyya

    Good reading and thank you for the great resources, Adi and Mirrin! When are you going to host the next book review Twitter chat that we had in June?

    Reply
  2. Swapna Yadav

    Superb blog !! Especially for all the techsavvy teachers who wander about to find a perfect beginning for their own CPD.

    Reply

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